Thursday, 7 May 2015

Owh Me Owh My...Health.


Owh why....why do they have to come out with all these superfoods, super this and super that almost on a yearly basis. Like an Academy Awards for for foods and other healthy things.
Honestly, I was at a per centum of 60% must-try-any-healthy-things introduced, and which I can get my hands on, but luckily I managed to overcome my (unhealthy) indulgence and realised that these, all these super everything are just cheap-trills.

Yup. Cheap trills for those health junkies.
And for those who created it, or coincidently bumped into it, even though it has been in existence for centuries by certain cultures around the globe -- it's mere hype seekers.

I got this in one of my 'healthy-emails' -- yup, must admit-- I'd never unsubscribe from those despite not following any of their repetitive suggestions.

Please ask yourself which of them that you've never know exist.


Coconut Flour, yes, coconut flour, not your (my) normal coconut milk, Kombucha, Ghee (yup Ghee),
Bone Broth and Kefir (first time hearing it myself) hail to the supposedly to be the 2015 superfood.


Image result for hanging yoga images
Human Bats, no?
Image result for hanging yoga images
For your good hanging.
No doubt, when health and wellness are having its crowning years now -- be it for purely health reasons or merely for wanting a bod looking like J-Lo's -- it is good.
It's easy for people to get health food, healthy meal takeouts, healthy mix smoothies or veg juices...you name it.

And what about those Western hyped up diets such as paleo, vegan, raw, macrobiotic. And gluten -free almost everything that I for once had been one of the Ooo-I-should-be-glutenfree person and had been quite conscious in giving gluten-free whatsoever to my kids.
But, in reality, trying to really stick on to a real gluten-free diet is like a 600lbs trying to wear size 10 in three months' time. And it gets even harder when almost what you see are not gluten-free.

Here are five basic warning signs to look for if you don't realise whether you're living a healthy life or an unhealthy one:

1. You often feel guilty about food choices.

If you eat something you consider "unhealthy" that isn't the norm in your diet, that is A-OK. You shouldn't become so consumed with guilt that you plan how you will correct your "cheating" through diet restrictions or exercise.

Unfortunately, this is a behavior that becomes a habit for many people, revealing that they may have taken "healthy eating" to an unhealthy extent. Having certain foods in moderation is actually good for you, even if these foods may be culturally-demonized as "unhealthy" or not in the scope of "clean eating." In fact, allowing yourself variety in your diet will allow you to stay on track with being healthy.

2. You eliminate food groups.

Eliminating entire food groups may deprive your body of important nutrients it needs and make your body crave the eliminated food, thus often resulting in binge eating. When you are striving to become healthier, it can be effective to limit certain categories like deep-fried foods, foods with a lot of sugar or highly processed, packaged snacks. But you shouldn't eliminate an entire food group without talking to your doctor first.

3. You're controlled by food.

You shouldn't have to spend hours of time, or inordinate amounts of mental energy (often involving anxiety) determining what to eat or how to prepare your food.

Also: make sure to enjoy social interactions, which often include eating and drinking in some form. You shouldn't miss social engagements because you're worried about the food they will serve or because it will mean you'll miss going to the gym.

4. You're critical of the way other people eat (or at least hyper-conscious of it).

When you're out to dinner, maybe you find yourself being judgmental of what your friend is ordering for his/her meal, or perhaps just find yourself distractingly focused on it.

The truth is that you can't control what anyone else puts in their body. Not everyone is going to eat healthy, or in the same way as you do. And that's OK. You shouldn't become critical or feel superior to those that don't eat only pure or healthy foods, or generally feel distressed if someone chooses to eat different foods than you generally. It's important to maintain healthy relationships with others even if they don't share the same thinking around eating that you do.

5. You're exhibiting depressive behaviors.

Many people do not realize that eating disorders are mental health disorders that require treatment. 50% of those that suffer from an eating disorder also have depression. If you've been sleeping too much or too little, can't concentrate, feel hopeless, have lost your appetite or can't stop eating, or have lost interest in daily activities, it's time to seek help for depression.

You need to find what works best for your own body to stay healthy, which includes listening to your body and understanding if you are turning to food because you are hungry or because of the way you are feeling.


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